experience

The Drama School Diaries Part 5: Hidden Expenses

So, you’re planning on auditioning for drama schools, but you’re not sure if you can afford it. You factor in the course fees, the accommodation, living costs etc. but there are also lots of other things you are going to have to pay out for while preparing for drama school.

  1. Auditions are expensive, as they are around £30 – £55 each, and when you audition for 5+ drama schools, it all adds up.
  2. If you are accepted onto a course, you will be given a list of things that you need to purchase for your training, such as leotards, ballet shoes, knee pads and much more. Again, this all adds up, especially when one pair of dance shoes can cost up to £50 alone.
  3. Your accommodation may not be within walking distance of your college, so you’re going to need to pay for your travel. Also, if you are living in London, you are most likely going to be relying on public transport to get around, so you should consider how costly travel is going to be.
  4. Nights out may not be a cost that everyone needs to consider, however most drama schools run freshers events during the first week of term, and if you are living with other students the chances are you will be going out and experiencing London’s nightlife. Tickets for freshers events can be expensive, and then nights out (especially in London) will be even more so, so this is also a factor to consider.

 

I hope this is helpful if you are trying to budget for drama school, and the best advice I can give is to save as much as possible now, so you can have the funds to make your dreams come true and afford drama school life.

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The Drama School Diaries Part 4

Dealing with Audition ‘Competition’

Obviously when preparing for auditions and during your auditions your number one priority needs to be you and what you’re doing. However, as you look around the room you will see countless other applicants, and the reality of how many people apply for these courses becomes very real. Naturally, you will try and compare yourself to them, you may think ‘if this many people are at one audition, how many people am I actually up against?’ and the competitive nature of these auditions can make you want to give up. You can’t see the point because that girl over there is more flexible than you, and that girl next to you has an incredible top range and the boy to your left can do back flips. Don’t get into this downward spiral of thoughts. Look at the boy doing back flips in the corner, and remind yourself that while he may be talented, he isn’t you. He does not have what you have, and neither does anyone else because you are one of a kind. This can be a hard thing to keep sight of when you’re surrounded by your competition, but you can’t let this phase you. Make friends with people, have a chat about how their other auditions are going, what songs they’re singing etc. It will make you feel much more at ease if you have a few friends who you can discuss the whole process with (after all, you’re all in the same boat anyway). Also when you are listening to other people singing and watching them dance or act, don’t judge them as if you are a member of the panel. Be supportive, and never for a second think ‘oh they won’t like him’ or ‘I’m way better than her’ because you shouldn’t bring others down to bring yourself up. A better response would be ‘they were good, and now lets show them what I’ve got’.

Often you will have to work in teams during your auditions, and if you don’t work well with others (you’re bossy, you shy away from the task or you are only focusing on yourself etc.) then the panel will notice this and this will go against you. Actors collaborate and work closely together, it’s not all about one person, especially when there is an ensemble of about twenty to thirty people onstage at the same time. So again, talking to people at your auditions will help you out when it comes to the workshops. Alternatively, if there are any current students at the auditions, ask them as many questions as possible (so you get more of an idea about whether the school is right for you). Basically, although you are effectively ‘competing’ against the other people in your audition, don’t compare yourself to anyone else. Be the best you can be, focus on yourself, but get to know the others and support them along the way as well.

I hope you’re all enjoying this series and finding it useful, and I’m open to topic requests so just let me know.

Lots of Love Lucy x

Childhood Memories

I recently did a blog post about school musicals, and yes, most young children do take part in these. But I feel that not enough children are being taken to London or even to their local theatre to see professional productions. I think they should get to have those kind of experiences, as it could open doors for them creatively. And if not, at least they gave it a go.

As a child my whole family loved musicals, and they still do, so I was exposed to them from a very young age. I went to ballet at the age of two and a half, and then soon joined other dance classes as well. I loved musicals and performing throughout my childhood, and I had seen many local professional productions and other shows up until I was 7, but I had never been to see a West End show. So, on my brother’s 10th birthday, we went to see Disney’s The Lion King.

That day I realised what I wanted to do with my life. I had always known my purpose in life was linked to performing and musical theatre, but seeing this show changed everything. The actress playing Rafiki at the time (I sadly can’t find the programme, so I cannot name her) was incredible! She had such a powerful and rich voice, as did all the cast. I was blown away by the amazing costumes and talent I saw that evening. It really was a magical moment for me, because it confirmed for me that this was where I needed to be in the future.

I think that being creative as a child really helps as you get older, even if you just want a hobby. You never know, a child could be incredibly talented, but because they do not know much about an industry, or think it is a possible career option, they could never get to share their talent with the world.

So parents and teachers, please think about this and encourage your children and students to go to the theatre. If the West End is too expensive, then go to your local theatre one evening, or enrol your child in an art club or a youth theatre company, and maybe a child’s life could fall into place just like mine did.